Why Frida Kahlo’s Art Is a Perfect Canvas for Summer Style

May 14, 2015 - garden totes



Frida Kahlo, Self-­Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird, 1940

Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas during Austin

Photo: 2014 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Long before her fanciful face lent a resplendence to receptacle bags and fridge magnets, a artist Frida Kahlo perplexed with her impediment beauty, her supernatural talent, her outsize personality.

The painter, who was innate in Mexico City in 1907, is now being distinguished with a New York Botanical Garden’s “Frida Kahlo: Art, Garden, Life.” The vaunt facilities a re-creation of her garden and studio, reimagining Kahlo’s Casa Azul, a artist’s home in Mexico City, that she remade with normal Mexican folk-art objects, colonial-era art, eremite ex-voto paintings, and local Mexican plants.

Kahlo had an unusual life of pleasures and pain. She suffered from polio as a child and gifted a horrific train collision when she was a teen (her fanciful farmer ensembles with their ankle-length hems were during slightest partially dictated to censor her shop-worn legs.) She married her mentor, a Communist muralist Diego Rivera, of whom she said, “There have been dual good accidents in my life. One was a trolley, and a other was Diego. Diego was by distant a worst.” (Nevertheless, she marry a man twice.) She fought depression, commenting wryly, “I drank since we wanted to drown my sorrows, though now a darned things have schooled to swim.”

But she had her fun too! She had affairs with Josephine Baker and Leon Trotsky (imagine a sham talk!). And her smashing gardens were certainly a source of solace. “I paint flowers so they will not die,” she once explained. She also embellished herself, in many relocating self-portraits, insuring that she, and her matchless style, will not die either.

 



Frida Kahlo, Two Nudes in a Forest, 1939

Collection of Jon Shirley

Photo: 2015 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York





Nickolas Muray, Frida with Olmeca Figurine, Coyoacán, 1939

Photo: Nickolas Muray Photo Archives





Frida Kahlo, Sun and Life, 1947

Private Collection Courtesy Galeria Arvil

Photo: 2014 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York





Frida Kahlo, Still Life (For Samuel Fastlicht), 1951

Private Collection, Courtesy of Caleria Arvil, Mexico

Photo: 2015 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York





Frida Kahlo, Self-­Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird, 1940

Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas during Austin

Photo: 2014 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York





Frida Kahlo, Small Life (II), 1928

Private Collection Courtesy Galeria Arvil

Photo: 2014 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York



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