At 2004 convention, Schlafly creates her indicate on happy matrimony — unabashedly

September 6, 2016 - garden totes

Editor’s note: This essay was published in a Los Angeles Times on Sept. 1, 2004. Phyllis Schlafly died Sept. 5, 2016. 

Phyllis Schlafly is a longtime competition of a happy rights movement.

Over a years, she has warned that a Equal Rights Amendment would lead to a approval of happy rights. She has pronounced people might approach “restrictions on homosexuals for open health reasons” given of AIDS. She has complained that children’s sex-education programs are dissipated to widespread a faith that homosexual sex is excusable if a condom is used, when educators should “just tell them to keep their hands out of what’s inside your swimsuit.”

If anyone has helped conservatives spike down a lumber in a Republican Party height hostile same-sex unions, it is this octogenarian stalwart, who emerged as a pivotal force this week behind denunciation ancillary a inherent anathema on happy marriage.

'Don't call me Ms. ... it means misery': Phyllis Schlafly, anti-feminist and regressive activist, dies during 92

‘Don’t call me Ms. … it means misery’: Phyllis Schlafly, anti-feminist and regressive activist, dies during 92

In a 10-year conflict over a Equal Rights Amendment in a 1970s, there was no some-more challenging competition than Phyllis Schlafly. 

Feminist personality Betty Friedan famously hissed during her during a debate, “I’d like to bake we during a stake.” Chicago columnist Mike Royko dubbed her “a inhabitant nag.”…

In a 10-year conflict over a Equal Rights Amendment in a 1970s, there was no some-more challenging competition than Phyllis Schlafly. 

Feminist personality Betty Friedan famously hissed during her during a debate, “I’d like to bake we during a stake.” Chicago columnist Mike Royko dubbed her “a inhabitant nag.”…

(Valerie J. Nelson)

Shrewd operator

Phyllis Schlafly is a disarming woman, with a stately though really approach manner. Earlier in a day, she greets a guest in a well-lighted apartment of an out-of-date hotel that is flashy with gilt mirrors and salmon toile. She smooths a dress of her lavender weave suit, that is set off by a bullion elephant pin and another spelling out “GOP.” Her blond hair is upswept in a retro marcel wave-style do.

But make no mistake: She is a intelligent domestic user who has beaten a raft of regressive planks into a series of Republican Party platforms over a years. Her St. Louis-based Eagle Forum is an successful regressive group.

Christian personality Ralph Reed, a Bush campaign’s coordinator for a Southeast region, pronounced Schlafly has been a behind-the-scenes actor on GOP height issues given she began attending as a nominee in a 1950s.

“Given her care on a pro-life lumber on a platform, she’s rarely reputable and well-regarded and influential,” he said. “She’s distinguished during each convention.”

Fellow regressive Gary Bauer pronounced Schlafly’s purpose reflects her status as a member of a anti-abortion movement, that he pronounced is ardently opposite to happy marriage.

“The whole pro-life transformation feels really strongly about that issue, as does a president,” he said. “I gamble if we asked a representatives to vote, it would be 99%” opposite same-sex marriage.

Schlafly’s son, an contention by profession, is a paid staffer, she says. He is executive of an Eagle Forum bureau in Alton, Ill., where he lives, and helps her with fundraising, scheduling and mail.

John Schlafly is a soft-spoken male with deep, fluent eyes, whose dim khakis and light string shirts furrow fast in a New York heat. He stops for a impulse to collect his thoughts when asked if he supports his mother’s signature emanate of a week, a inherent anathema on happy marriage.

“I consider a normal clarification of matrimony has served a multitude well, and it shouldn’t be changed,” John Schlafly says, selecting his difference slowly. “That was a law in each state, and still is solely for certain justice decisions. we don’t see since there’s anything wrong with it.”

On this day, he is assisting his mom arrange by a stacks of celebration invitations that can make a entertainment knowledge as disorienting as a video on fast-forward. Phyllis Schlafly idly asks her son what day of a week it is.

On this night, there is a probability of a cooking with a Missouri delegation, he tells his mother. And a some-more intemperate celebration thrown by associate regressive Grover Norquist of Americans for Tax Reform. People are observant a latter is “the fascinating place to be, not a Missouri people,” he tells her.

“Why, given they’re conservatives?” she asks.

“Well, Grover has a repute of throwing a good party,” he says knowingly.

But first, there is a book signing. Lugging large receptacle bags congested with books, mom and son brief into a erotic afternoon and raise into a New York taxi. The motorist goes a integrate of blocks and pulls over with a scowl. There’s no approach he’s streamer into a common stupidity of crowds and military barricades around Madison Square Garden — not even for a fragile-looking aged lady.

Thus starts a Great Trek down 34th Street.

After a few swarming blocks installed down with books, a travel seems like an impassioned sport. But Phyllis Schlafly, a Olympian of a regressive movement, won’t even steep into Macy’s for refreshment. Finally, she spots a hotel (“Oasis!” she says) for a signing of a anthology “Thank You, President Bush,” to that she has contributed.

“The charge of a whole intimately romantic village to benefaction sodomy as a homogeneous of a Holy Sacrament — we can’t leave that adult to a states,” a speaker, Star Parker, is observant as a Schlaflys travel into a hotel accepting room where a eventuality is in progress.

Parker, a usually African American on a panel, is “a former singular Los Angeles gratification mother” and author. (“As we indicate out in my book, ‘Uncle Sam’s Plantation,’ a pulsating obsolete rhythms and rhymes of swat song simply simulate a truths that are transmitted to blacks by a wafer-thin veneer of renouned American culture,” reads a thoroughfare from her section in “Thank You, President Bush.”)

“I know a left, and we am here to contend they are wrong,” Parker tells a really tiny entertainment of faded-looking people who done it by a Darwinian barrier march of heat, barricades and sealed hotel doors to attend a event.

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